Health

Can posture improve double chin?

When it comes to facial care and beauty, we either consider cosmetic products or worry about extra weight. However, body alignment affects our appearance a lot, too. We spend more and more time looking down while texting, working on computers, reading books, which makes our necklines droop. This poor body alignment weakens the chin and neck muscles. Slouching affects facial muscles in a tremendous way. It makes skin to become more lax. Rounded shoulders create a saggy jawline, tightness in our chests and impact our self-confidence. 

Why double chin appears?

Chiropractic doctor Dr. Liza Egbogah explains that pushed forward head is called anterior head carriage. Your head is no longer in line with the rest of your body in such position. It is caused by extensive sitting and hunching over a computer. Head forward pushes fat under your chin forward and gives you a double chin, even if you aren’t overweight. Additionally, tight trapezius muscles results in a shorter, stockier neck.

How to reduce a double chin?

We have some good news for you! Improving your posture may be enough to minimize your double chin. Better posture can also reduce your risk for other health conditions like back pain, joint degeneration, and even a potbelly. You can start from simple exercises that will subsequently change the way you look and feel.

  1. Stretching deep neck flexors - muscles at the front of your neck - can help you bring your chin to where it should be. To start, make sure your upper and lower back are in neutral alignment. Then tuck the chin towards the neck, and gently extend the head back towards the ceiling. 
  2. Face-lifting exercise works on the muscles around the upper lips, and prevents sagging. While doing this exercise, open your mouth wide and flare your nostrils. Hold this position for about 10 seconds before you release it. More exercises example: 
  3. In order to increase exercise effectiveness and develop posture memory, wear Etalon bra. It’s fashionable, comfortable, and doesn’t require any lifestyle changes. 

What is facial posture?

Have you heard about facial posture? Yup, that’s right! Our beautiful faces can also “slouch” which affects our mimic wrinkles and how we age. Facial posture reflects how you hold your facial expression similar to how you hold your body. We have habits of facial expressions like furrowing of the brow when focusing or concentrating, or a tightening of the jaw or a squinting of the eyes, or a lifting of the forehead. They are associated with how we're feeling mentally and emotionally. However, especially stress-related facial muscles tension can influence on skin quality. Good facial posture is how you look when you're totally relaxed. 

Similar to body alignment, the best way to maintain healthy posture is bringing awareness to your facial muscles. By being aware of your body and also your face, you can change your mental state and the way your face looks for the better. There are many technics how to relax facial muscles. You can check facial fitness or massage exercises. From traditional holistic medicine we got tools like gua sha or cupping.

How else posture affects beauty?

Posture can affect other body parts, too. For example, poor posture can create a belly or a “paunch” in someone who is otherwise slim. It happens because of tight hip flexors. Stretching your hip flexors can help bring your pelvis back to where it should be, creating a flatter stomach.

Bad posture causes back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, foot pain, and of course it’s difficult to look good when something hurts. If your shoulders creep up closer to your ears, it might be a sign that you have bad posture. Or having one shoulder higher than the other. The first step for improvement is to start noticing improper alignment. Seeing a chiropractor might help release the tension in misaligned areas before they start causing pain.

Sources:

https://www.wellandgood.com/ideo-skin-memory-serum/ 

https://faceyogaaustralia.com/change-your-posture-to-remove-double-chin/

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk on Pexels.com

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